Releasing Your Psoas (AKA Hip Flexors)

The psoas and I have a hate – hate relationship.  For the past 15 years, I have been dealing with hip flexors problems.  I finally realized that the problems stem from a muscle called the psoas.  This muscle runs from our lower back to the front of our leg.  It is a very important muscle for walking.

psoas1

http://tiawellness.wordpress.com/2011/10/22/the-incredible-indelible-psoas-the-back-edition/

 

psoas_major_and_min

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/psoas+major

 

It is a muscle that is also VERY tight in most people because we are a culture that sits so much.  When we sit the psoas become tights and shortened.  This can cause back discomfort and the lower ribs to be pushed forward.  One of the reasons, I push my ribs forward a lot is because the upper part of my psoas is too tight to NOT push it forward.  The action of pushing my ribs forward is one of the reasons I have a diastasis recti.

The below video demonstrates me doing one of the most effective stretches I have found for releasing the psoas.  The psoas is a muscle that is reactive.  So if you push this stretch too much you might find it causes more problems than benefits.  So proceed slowly, you don’t need to perfect this stretch or push yourself too deeply into it.  Just let your body be present and breathe.  Enjoy.

About christinamroz

Believer that anyone at any age and with any abilities can move their body. Foot & Core Expert. Alignment Nerd. Yoga/Fitness Instructor & Trainer. Mother of 4 active children.
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5 Responses to Releasing Your Psoas (AKA Hip Flexors)

  1. Heather Johnson says:

    LOVE LOVE LOVE. Thank you for this gift!

  2. Lenard says:

    Your info is really helpful.

  3. Amanda Stilwell says:

    THANK YOU for this – you are so amazing.

  4. Kristen says:

    Thank you so much. I’ve been dealing with severe psoas pain and also have Diastasis Recti from my 2 pregnancies. While I realize they are two separate issues, I’m having the diastasis surgically fixed soon and am hoping that will also relieve some of the psoas pain (or at least make it more manageable). I appreciate your videos!

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